Ako by vyzerali panovníci z minulosti v modernej dobe? Nadaná umelkyňa ti to ukáže (2. časť)

Slávni panovníci v modernom kabáte.

Zdroj: royalty_now_ / instagram.com

Prvý článok zo série Royalty Now, ktorý sme ti na EMEFKA priniesli pred nejakým časom, sa stretol s pomerne veľkým úspechom. Talentovaná grafička Becca Saladin v tejto sérii zobrazuje známych panovníkov, kráľov, kráľovné či princezné v modernom kontexte. Ako by asi vyzeral Tutanchamón či kráľovná Mária I. v súčasnosti?

Na túto otázku nájdeš odpoveď nižšie. Prinášame ti totiž ďalších 19 vydarených modernizovaných podobizní významných osobností svetových dejín.

1. Hürrem Sultán (Roksolana Lisowska)

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Hürrem Sultan, also known as Roxelana, was the chief consort and legal wife of the Ottoman Sultan Suleiman the Magnificent. She became one of the most powerful and influential women in Ottoman history and a prominent and controversial figure during the era known as the Sultanate of Women. Born in what is now modern-day Ukraine, Hurrem was originally a captive from a slave raid in her home country of Ruthenia. She entered the Imperial Harem of Suleiman (a former Royalty Now subject). Famously, Hurrem rose through the ranks of the harem, catching the special attention of Suleiman. The pair fell in love, and breaking with Ottoman tradition, Suleiman made Hurrem his legal wife and the first imperial consort to receive the title of Haseki Sultan. The pair had six children. Hurrem is famous for not only being beautiful and the wife of the great Sultan, but also for being smart and active in the affairs and direction of the empire. She acted as Suleiman’s chief advisor and corresponded with politicians on matters of state both foreign and domestic. . Prints are available for Hurrem! Please visit the link in my bio to go directly to the Etsy shop. . If you’re interested in supporting my work in other ways, here are a few ways: Patreon: Link in Bio Paypal: www.paypal.me/royaltynow Venmo: @Becca-Saladin . Left Portrait: Public Domain, Right Portrait base: iStock photo. Created using @photoshop. . #Hurrem #Roxelana #Suleiman #OttomanEmpire #Turkey #OttomanHistory #ArtHistory #Photomanipulation #Editing #DigitalArt #DigitalDrawing #Edits #Photoedits #Retouching #portrait #Drawing #GraphicDesign #HistoryMemes #Portrait #ArtRestoration #DigitalArt #ArtOnInstagram #History

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2. Süleyman I.

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So many requests for Suleiman lately! This is my first portrait from a profile view which I actually enjoyed a lot. The best portraits of many Ottoman sultans use this style instead of the typical three-quarters portrait we see in Europe. His wife Hurrem is also one of the top requests and she will be posted soon as well. . Suleiman I, known as Suleiman the Magnificent in the West and Kanunî Sultan Süleyman in his realm, was the longest-reigning Sultan of the Ottoman Empire from 1520 until his death in 1566. Under his rule, the Ottoman state ruled over at least 25 million people – what many scholars call the apex of the Empire. Suleiman and his military were a force to be reckoned with – shortly after ascending the throne, he began campaigns against Christian powers of Europe and the Mediterranean. Changes made by Suleiman to the Empire included major overhauls of society, education, taxes, and law. . Breaking with Ottoman tradition, Suleiman married Hürrem Sultan, a Christian woman from his harem who converted to Islam. Scholars agree Suleiman's reign was a watershed in Ottoman history. In the decades after Suleiman, the empire began to experience significant political, institutional, and economic changes, a phenomenon often referred to as the Transformation of the Ottoman Empire. . If you’re interested in supporting my work please consider donating a few bucks so I can purchase my software and the stock photos needed 🙂 A few ways to support: Patreon: Link in Bio Paypal: www.paypal.me/royaltynow Venmo: @Becca-Saladin Appreciate you all so much! This one is available right now as a digital download in 5×7 & 8×10 sizes on my Etsy shop (https://www.etsy.com/shop/RoyaltyNow). As soon as I get the printing situation figured out I will link that here as well. . Left Portrait: Public Domain, Right Portrait base: iStock photo. Created using @photoshop. . #Suleiman #SuleimantheMagnificent #Ottomans #OttomanEmpire #Turkey #Turkish #HurremSultan #Roxelana #MehmedtheConqueror #Photocomposite #Photomanipulation #Editing #DigitalArt #DigitalDrawing #Edits #Photoedits #Retouching #portrait #Drawing #GraphicDesign #HistoryMemes #Portrait #ArtRestoration #DigitalArt

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3. Kleopatra VII.

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Friday bonus post! A lot of you asked me when I posted my original Cleopatra if I could make her with curly hair. I created this new version for those requests – which do y’all like better? . As a reminder, Cleo was part of the Ptolemaic dynastic, a Hellenistic dynasty ruling Egypt – so her skin would be lighter than the typical Egyptian 😊 . If you’re interested in supporting my work please consider donating a few bucks so I can purchase my software and the stock photos needed 🙂 A few ways to support: Patreon: Link in Bio Paypal: www.paypal.me/royaltynow Venmo: @Becca-Saladin I’m also hoping to get an Etsy shop up and running here soon! I appreciate my supporters so dearly. . Left Portrait: Public Domain, Right Portrait base: iStock photo. Created using @photoshop.

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4. Alžbeta I.

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I’ve been wanting to recreate Elizabeth I using a different portrait for a while. I wanted to do a portrait of an older Elizabeth since she was a long-reigning queen – she was 42 at the time she sat for this portrait. Honestly, this is one of my favorite creations I’ve made. I love how elegant she looks as a chic, modern-day Englishwoman. I lowered the plucked hairline (popular for her era), gave her some blush and a more natural skin tone (she is wearing lead makeup in this portrait), and added some well-earned wrinkles that I’m sure she would have in modern-day. When you compare this one to my original Elizabeth creation (created over a year ago), I feel like I’ve grown leaps and bounds and that is super rewarding to see as a creator. After all, if you’re not embarrassed by your old works you’re probably not doing it right 😉 . There are prints of this work available! Etsy.com/shop/royaltynow . If you’re interested in supporting my work please consider donating a few bucks so I can purchase my software and the stock photos needed 🙂 A few ways to support: Patreon: Patreon.com/Royaltynow Paypal: www.paypal.me/royaltynow Venmo: @Becca-Saladin . Left Portrait: Public Domain, Right Portrait base: iStock photo. Created using @photoshop . #ElizabethI #Tudors #AnneBoleyn #MaryI #EdwardVI #HenryVIII #HenryVII #BritishHistory #EnglishHistory #Photomanipulation #Editing #DigitalArt #DigitalDrawing #Edits #Photoedits #Retouching #portrait #Drawing #GraphicDesign #HistoryMemes #Portrait #ArtRestoration #DigitalArt #ArtOnInstagram #History

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5. Mumtaz Mahal

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Mumtaz Mahal was the Empress consort of the Mughal Empire from 1628 to 1631 as the chief wife of Mughal emperor Shah Jahan. She is most famously known as the woman for whom the Taj Mahal was built to act as a tomb. Cited as one of the Wonders of the World, the monument is seen as one of undying love and devotion. Mumtaz (born Arjumand Banu Begum) was born to a Persian noble family in 1593, and became betrothed to Shah Jahan at the age of 19. The couple went on to have 14 children – the last of which caused Mumtaz’s death. Unfortunately there are no known contemporary portraits of Mumtaz, so I am working from a 17th-18th century likeness. Mumtaz lived an unprecedented lavish and luxurious lifestyle. She had a massive allowance for clothing and travel. However, she was more than a vapid character of history – she was Shah Jahan’s trusted advisor and confidante. On her advice, he would forgive enemies and even commute death sentences. She intervened on behalf of the poor and destitute, and was a patron of arts and culture throughout the empire. . If you’re interested in supporting my work please consider donating a few bucks so I can purchase my software and the stock photos needed ❤️ A few ways to support: Patreon: Link in Bio Paypal: www.paypal.me/royaltynow Venmo: @Becca-Saladin . I’m also hoping to get some prints going here soon! I’ve made a couple of prints available for digital download in my Etsy shop but I’m still working on creating physical prints. I appreciate my supporters so dearly. . Left Portrait: Public Domain, Right Portrait base: iStock photo. Created using @photoshop. . #MumtazMahal #ShahJahan #TajMahal #IndianArt #IndianHistory #Photocomposite #Photomanipulation #Editing #DigitalArt #DigitalDrawing #Edits #Photoedits #Retouching #portrait #Drawing #GraphicDesign #HistoryMemes #Portrait #ArtRestoration #DigitalArt #ArtOnInstagram #HistoryNerd

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6. Achnaton

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Akhenaten was an ancient Egyptian pharaoh born in 1380 BCE that reigned circa 1353–1336 BCE. Before the fifth year of his reign, he was known as Amenhotep IV. One of his wives was the famous Nefertiti (a previous subject of Royalty Now). Akhenaten and Nefertiti were known for a religious revolution, during which they cast away the multiple Egyptian gods and began a monotheistic religion centered around the sun god, Aten (the reason for the name change from Amenhotep to Akhenaten). The new religious ways were not widely accepted by the Egyptian people or nobles, and gradually returned to normal after his (supposed) son King Tutankhamun became the leader. Akhenaten reigned at what was arguably the wealthiest period of Ancient Egyptian history, known now as the Amarna period. The art of the Amarna period deviated drastically from the previous art style – it was much less formal and full of curvier, more realistic portrayals of the rulers, which is why we have such beautiful portraits of both Akhenaten and Nefertiti. Compare their portraits to previous subject Hatshepsut, and you will see the stylistic difference. . If you’re interested in supporting my work please consider donating a few bucks a month so I can purchase my software and the stock photos needed: patreon.com/royaltynow. You can also make a one-time donation at www.paypal.me/royaltynow or Venmo @becca-saladin. I appreciate my supporters so dearly ❤️ . Left Portrait: Public Domain, Right Portrait base: iStock photo. Created using @photoshop . #Akhenaten #Nefertiti #Amarna #EgyptianArt #EgyptianHistory #Pharaoh #Egypt #AfricanArt #AfricanHistory #EuropeanHistory #EuropeanArt #portrait #Drawing #GraphicDesign #HistoryMemes #Portrait #ArtRestoration #DigitalArt #ArtOnInstagram #HistoryNerd

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7. Alexander Veľký

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Wanted to do a little bonus update post today, because I make some updates from time to time on older works utilizing more techniques I’ve learned over the years. He’s been a favorite post of mine since the beginning! . A little bit about my depiction: Alexander had a condition called Heterochromia, which is where the eyes are a patchwork of colors or each eye is a different color. Descriptions of him give him golden curly hair (which is why I made his skin tone a bit lighter as well). He also was likely gay or bisexual (despite those labels being more of a modern construction than ancient peoples’ notion of them), so happy pride month y’all 🏳️‍🌈 . If you’re interested in supporting my work please consider donating a few bucks a month so I can purchase my software and the stock photos needed: patreon.com/royaltynow. You can also make a one-time donation at www.paypal.me/royaltynow. I appreciate my supporters so dearly. . Left Portrait: Public Domain, Right Portrait base: iStock photo. Created using @photoshop.

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8. Katarína II.

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I got SO MANY requests for Catherine the Great this week & last because of the Hulu show. I watched a few episodes and it’s amazing so far but I haven’t had a chance to finish yet. I actually didn’t know much about Catherine the Great (besides the horse myth….yikes) so this was interesting to research! One thing I wasn’t expecting was how difficult researching her hair color would be. Sources and portraits show Catherine with beautiful blue eyes, but they differ sometimes on her hair. In the show and in one or two sources she is depicted as a blonde, but many more sources and portraits show her with rich dark hair – so that’s what I went with here. . Catherine II (born Sophie of Anhalt-Zerbst) was born in 1729 – this portrait was dated to the mid 1760s, so it puts her approximately in her mid 30s. Known as Catherine the Great, she was Empress of Russia from 1762 until 1796 – the country's longest-ruling female leader. She was married to the inept Tsar Peter III upon arriving in Russia, and came to power in a coup that she organized herself. Under her rule, Russia thrived, growing larger and stronger until it became one of the main powers of Eurasia. Catherine was an admirer of Peter the Great, and embarked on a modernization campaign of Russia. Despite her efforts, Russia still had its shortcomings – Russia was still using serf labor while Catherine ruled – causing several rebellions and uprisings. Catherine was a supporter of the arts, humanities, and a supporter of the Enlightenment. Many historians agree that Russia was in its “Golden Age” while Catherine ruled. . If you’re interested in supporting my work please consider donating a few bucks a month so I can purchase my software and the stock photos needed: patreon.com/royaltynow. You can also make a one-time donation at www.paypal.me/royaltynow. I appreciate my supporters so dearly. . Left Portrait: Public Domain, Right Portrait base: iStock photo. Created using @photoshop. . #Catherinethegreat #hulu #thegreat #ellefanning #Russia #RussianHistory #RussianArt #Austria #EuropeanArt #EuropeanArtHistory #ArtHistory#Photoshop #RoyalFamily #History #Royalty #EuropeanArt #EuropeanHistory #Drawing #GraphicDesign

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9. Kráľovná Nzinga

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Nzinga was a figure whose name I recognized but I didn’t know too much about – a kind follower gave me some tips on working on her and some great information on Angolan culture. This portrait is a version done by Achille Deveria which is based on original drawings completed by Giovanni Cavazzi during his travels to Portguese Angola. The portrait looks pretty normal, but with it being a copy of an original (and then also colorized), I discovered some quirks that made it difficult to work from. The face is painted at a strange angle to the neck, and the nose and mouth are painted from almost two different perspectives. It was a challenge to correct for those inconsistencies and also make it look just like her/the portrait, but a really fun creation! . Nzinga was the Queen of the Kingdom of Ndongo and the Kingdom of Matamba in the 17th century, in the area of modern-day Angola. Born into the ruling family in 1583, her father trained her in military and political tactics from a young age. While her older brother was ruling the Kingdoms, he asked Nzinga to become the ambassador to Portugal for him, as the Portuguese had begun to colonize and infringe on their native area. When Nzinga assumed power over the kingdoms after her brother died, it was during a period of unprecedented growth in the African slave trade. The Portuguese continued to agitate and break treaties, taking slaves and other valuables. Nzinga was an astute and super-intelligent leader and often bent the allegiances of the Europeans to her advantage. Forging an alliance with the Dutch, she was able to defeat the Portuguese and drive them out. She also made her kingdom a safe haven for runaway slaves. Her reign lasted 37 years – she is considered a legendary figure in Angola to this day. For more, I really enjoyed the Nzinga episode of @thehistorychicks podcast. . If you’re interested in supporting my work please consider donating a few bucks a month so I can purchase my software and the stock photos needed: patreon.com/royaltynow. You can also make a one-time donation at www.paypal.me/royaltynow. I appreciate my supporters so dearly. . Left Portrait: Public Domain, Right Portrait base: iStock photo.

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10. Catherine Parr

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So far the only holdout on all six wives of King Henry VIII on this page was Catherine Parr, the last wife. I do plan to revise and repost some other wives like Anne Boleyn and Katherine Howard, so stay tuned for those! I will do a post with them all together once I’m happy with all of them. . Catherine Parr was queen of England from 1543 – 1547. Catherine and Anne of Cleves were the lucky two that outlived King Henry VIII. Although she’s one of the more forgotten wives, probably because her story is not as “sexy” as the first five, she was a fascinating figure in her own right. Catherine took a special interest in Henry’s children, Edward, Mary and Elizabeth, and helped with their education. We never would have had the reign of the great Queen Elizabeth I had she not lived – Catherine was instrumental in the passing of the Act of Succession (1543) that placed Mary and Elizabeth back in the line of succession. Catherine was a devout protestant and author – she published prayer books anonymously and later published “Prayers and Meditations” and “The Lamentation of a Sinner” under her own name. Catherine served as Princess Elizabeth’s guardian after the King’s death in 1547, serving a critical role during this period of Tudor transition. . If you’re interested in supporting my work please consider donating a few bucks so I can purchase my software and the stock photos needed: patreon.com/royaltynow (monthly) or www.paypal.me/royaltynow (one time). I appreciate my supporters so dearly. . Left Portrait: Public Domain, Right Portrait base: Pexels. Information: based from Wikipedia. Created using @photoshop. . #CatherineParr #HenryVIII #KatherineofAragon #AnneBoleyn #KatherineHoward #1500s #BritishHistory #EnglishHistory #Photoshop #RoyalFamily #History #Royalty #EuropeanArt #EuropeanHistory #Drawing #GraphicDesign #HistoryMemes #Portrait #ArtRestoration #DigitalArt #ArtOnInstagram

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11. Šaka

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Shaka Zulu is one that is pretty highly requested, but I’ve been resisting it because this statue is the only good depiction I found to work from, but wasn’t sculpted from life – it’s actually located in Camden Market in the UK. There are drawings and depictions of him (none contemporary that I know of), that depict him in this same way, so I feel it does have elements of accuracy. Even though this one may not be totally accurate, I hope you all enjoy it anyway! . Shaka kaSenzangakhona (Shaka Zulu) was a powerful South African King, ruling over the Zulu Kingdom from 1816 – 1828. He was born in 1787 near present-day Melmoth, KwaZulu-Natal Province. Shaka was the illegitimate son of the previous king, and served as a soldier in his youth. When Shaka came to power, he began to expand the empire and align with smaller neighbors to protect them from their Northern enemies, the Ndwandwe. Shaka preferred to apply diplomatic pressure over warfare. He was a master of social and propagandistic political methods, as well as a great warrior when he decided to engage. He is often depicted holding the distinctive spear and shield of the Zulu warriors. Shaka was ultimately assassinated by his own half brothers, Dingane and Mhlangana. His reputation is a bit shaky, as scholars disagree on the extent to which he revolutionized warfare methods as he is credited. Overall a really interesting figure to learn about. . If you’re interested in supporting my work please consider donating a few bucks a month so I can purchase my software and the stock photos needed: patreon.com/royaltynow. You can also make a one-time donation at www.paypal.me/royaltynow. I appreciate my supporters so dearly. . Left Portrait: Public Domain (if anyone knows the actual sculptor, I was struggling to find the right credit), Right Portrait base: iStock photo. Information: based from Wikipedia. Created using @photoshop. . #ShakaZulu #SouthAfrica #AfricanHistory #AfricanArt #Zulu #ZuluWarriors #AfricanKing #Photoshop #RoyalFamily #History #Royalty #EuropeanArt #EuropeanHistory #Drawing #GraphicDesign #HistoryMemes #Portrait #ArtRestoration #DigitalArt #ArtOnInstagram

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12. Pocahontas

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Pocahontas (c. 1596 – March 1617) was a Native American woman notable for her association with the colonial settlement at Jamestown, Virginia and her travels to England. She was the daughter of the chief Powhatan, the great chief of a network of tributary tribes in the Tsenacommacah, encompassing the Tidewater region of Virginia. The representation I’ve worked from here is a painted copy of an original engraving – the only portrait made of Pocahontas during her lifetime. Working from the engraving probably would have been more accurate, but generally I need a painting to work from. The portrait was made by an English artist, hence why she looks so Anglicized. It’s possible that her clothing might have been hiding tattoos or that some could have been “photoshopped” off her face by the engraver Simon de Passe to better show her as a “civilized” woman fit for English sensibilities. I wanted to include a version of her here that honors her Algonquin heritage much more than the portrait does. If you swipe, you’ll see a version of Pocahontas with a version of traditional Algonquin tattooing on her face. . More about Pocohontas: We don’t have that many details of her life, but it was certainly not what the Disney film was showing us! She never had a love affair with John Smith and she didn’t save his life during his capture. Pocahontas was captured by hostile colonists in 1613 and encouraged to convert to Christianity – her christian name became “Rebecca”. She married John Rolfe, and they traveled to London together, attempting to show that she was a “Civilized Savage” in hopes of getting more support and supplies to the Jamestown settlement. Unfortunately Pocahontas died on the return voyage of an unknown illness at the young age of 21 or 22. . If you’re interested in supporting my work please consider donating a few bucks a month so I can purchase my software and the stock photos needed: patreon.com/royaltynow. Just a few posts ago, I showed a bit of work on this one and I have a tutorial on the Curves tool using this image as an example for those who would choose to support! . Left Portrait: Public Domain, Right Portrait base: iStock Photo.

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13. Alexander Hamilton

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I must admit, I didn’t know too much about Alexander Hamilton before starting this one – I haven’t had the opportunity to see the namesake musical that has put him back into the forefront of the American consciousness in the last few years. Alexander Hamilton was a Founding Father of the United States, being an integral developer of the constitution as well as the founder of our financial system. Hamilton lived a massively interesting life filled with war, satesmanship, a sex scandal, a duel, and so much more. I’ve only scratched the surface with my research – what’s your favorite fact about him? . If you would like to support my work you can do so by joining the Patreon and gaining exclusive perks like seeing posts a week before they are posted here, seeing some of my greatest failures, and watching creation videos. (www.patreon.com/royaltynow) or I have a “Tip Jar” here at www.paypalme/royaltynow. This work costs money to create, so any help is much appreciated ❤️ . Left Portrait: Public Domain, Right Portrait base: istock photo

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14. Tutanchamón

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The Patreon pollsters have selected King Tut as the next subject! I know this is a little different than my usual post. This time, I’ve been given permission to use this recreation by the forensic artist (& my idol) Elisabeth Daynes (@atelier_daynes). This recreation of King Tut has long been my favorite, and was created in 2005 when 2 teams were tasked with recreating what King Tut may have looked like. It shows some of the features that may have been the result of inbreeding, such as the overbite and weak chin. I realize that the hard work here has been done for me by Daynes, but I wanted to bring him into the modern day. Hope you enjoy. . . If you would like to support my work you can do so by joining the Patreon and gaining exclusive perks like seeing posts a week before they are posted here, seeing some of my greatest failures, and watching creation videos. (www.patreon.com/royaltynow) or I have a “Tip Jar” here at www.paypalme/royaltynow. This work costs money to create, so any help is much appreciated ❤️ . Left Image: © reconstruction Elisabeth Daynes, Right Image pieces: iStock Photo & Pixabay.com

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15. Izabela I.

16. Benjamin Franklin

17. Mária I.

18. Anastázia Nikolajevna Romanovová

19. Agrippina Mladšia

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